Participant’s review Geotales Workshop Madrid

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During the day and half workshop a creative chain reaction came along specially focused on ideas related with water as a way to create our own subjective map. After a few hours dedicating ourselves to research and discussion about a possible theme for a project: trying out water drawing, searching for possible stories, fictional and real, and ways of action. GTM08A decision had to be made and finally we realized that the interest was obviously oriented to the invisibility of the water in Móstoles.

After years of protest and claims made by the people, in 1980 (in some references 1982) the water supplied by the canal Isabel II finally arrived to the village of Móstoles, a small town nearby Madrid. Before the canal Isabel II came, the town’s water resources were the wells connected between them. But this water system did not satisfied the needs of the growing population that more that 20 years ago was almost 150 000* inhabitants and today is about 200 000*. The settled goal was then to try to find where are or were the old wells that provided water to the population by asking people if they knew if there’s still exists any old well or if they still remember where they were. This marked the moment to go outside, with GPS in our pockets and a couple of bottles of water. We gave ourselves the task of trying to find the location of those wells at the same time we would make short intervention with water by drawing sometimes a simple line or get inspired and draw something specific.

Once outside the the search for the right people who could give us some information began. We were more like three complete strangers with little information that wanted to go somewhere without knowing the streets where we were moving in. Almost by instinct, our favorite victims became the elder people believing that the chances of getting some useful information were high. In this aspect was a little disappointing and in fact our major informers were the taxi drives.

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